The Value of a Secret

Suppose that, while teaching a class some engaging topic, I keep a secret from the class and only reveal it at the end of the term. This secret provides a sudden realization to the students that they can take into their next year — A real ‘Aha! moment’. I only ask them that they do not reveal the secret to any classes that haven’t taken the course yet so that they can have the same experience. This may work for a while, but inevitably one student, through malice or ignorance, will reveal the secret to someone they shouldn’t have. This then spreads throughout the whole student body until the experience for all future classes is ruined.

The value of a secret can be tied inherently to its secrecy. In the case above, revealing the secret leads to a realization and experience that would have been lost if the knowledge was simply given in a standard manner. We see this in varying degrees in many mediums.

Suspense films can rely on building a feeling without ‘revealing’. String along the audience and tease them with sudden glimpses — or was it? Sometimes the ‘secret’ is never actually revealed and the audience is left wondering what ‘it’ could have been — a lasting effect to be sure! Sometimes the ‘secret’ is revealed to the audience but not to the characters, and the audience is left to observe the resulting effect on the unknowing participants. All experiences in the case of suspense are tied directly to the disclosure or non-disclosure of a secret — and to whom.

Consider the explorer. In ages past an explorer set out into unknown lands or seas to make the ‘unknown’ known. Perhaps it was for knowledge, or perhaps it was for fame, but many died in pursuit of it. Today we can say the same about space. Our chosen few who lead our race in discovering one of the last great ‘unknowns’.

Our desire to discover what is not known is insatiable. We thrive on the pursuit. We revel in it.

Now, perhaps, you are wondering why the title of this article is ‘The Value of A Secret’ and not ‘Humans Love to Discover’. And my answer to you would be that it is important to set the stage for things that are yet to come.

Humans do love to discover — Even if it means that the discovery will reduce their enjoyment.

Let’s consider the magician. We can rest assured that the man standing on stage and pulling rabbits out of hats does not, for better or worse, have divine powers. He has honed his craft that is to be sure, but he is no wizard. He is an expert at deceiving. Our wonder stems from the curiosity welling within each person sitting in the faux-velvet seats that, at one time, may have doubled as a beer coaster. It is that curiosity that may also drive us to speculate on how the trick was done or to buy a ticket to see it again. The experience is in the deception. Once the secret is revealed the experience is ruined for all, and the poor magician who mastered his craft must now work ever harder and devious in his deceptions.

There can be value for those to whom the secret is not revealed — and never is. Secrets can be a source of awe and wonder. They can drive one to build a ship and cross vast oceans, throw caution to the wind and trek into unknown lands, and build a rocket and ride it to the moon.

For the explorer, who is driven by such experiences, there is irony in the fact that their very actions reduce the total number of things left to discover — no matter how little the contribution.

With the awe and inspiration that secrets can evoke it is important to note that some secrets are meant to be discovered and shared. What would have happened if Alexander Fleming did not discover penicillin and shared it with the world? What about the snake-oil salesmen and ‘men with powers’ who used their secrets not to entertain but to deceive many to their detriment. We would agree that it is important to expose frauds and predatory practices.

This is not to say that secrets should never be revealed but to explain that there is value in many secrets staying secrets. This value may be in the form of awe, wonder, suspense, entertainment, and inspiration just to name a few. Alas it is important to note that secrets also protect you.

How do you hide dissidents from oppressive governments without secrets? Just because one lives in a developed country does not make them immune to policy change and legislation. What about communication? How can you talk with the assurance that there isn’t anyone listening in to your conversation? Shouldn’t your bank information be kept secret from prying eyes?

Sometimes is it important to have secrets. Secrets that are hidden from everyone but the very few people you trust to hold them. If one of your trusted few ever reveals the secret they are removed from the privileged few.

Many governments in recent times should be removed from the privileged few.

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