General, Security, Privacy

History and its Uncanny Ability to Repeat Itself

The EFF has published a well-cited and informed article on why they view the current trend of dragnet surveillance to be thoroughly against the constitution of the U.S.

Even if you are not an American, this article touches on the ideals of many. It describes the context around why the Fourth Amendment was included and goes into specific detail as to who and why they thought it so important:

“Using ‘writs of assistance,’ the King authorized his agents to carry out wide ranging searches to anyone, anywhere, and anytime regardless of whether they were suspected of a crime. These ‘hated writs’ spurred colonists toward revolution and directly motivated James Madison’s crafting of the Fourth Amendment.”

I highly recommend reading the entire article: The NSA’s “General Warrants”: How the Founding Fathers Fought an 18th Century Version of the President’s Illegal Domestic Spying

 

Standard
General

The Value of a Secret

Suppose that, while teaching a class some engaging topic, I keep a secret from the class and only reveal it at the end of the term. This secret provides a sudden realization to the students that they can take into their next year — A real ‘Aha! moment’. I only ask them that they do not reveal the secret to any classes that haven’t taken the course yet so that they can have the same experience. This may work for a while, but inevitably one student, through malice or ignorance, will reveal the secret to someone they shouldn’t have. This then spreads throughout the whole student body until the experience for all future classes is ruined.

Continue reading

Standard
General, Technical

Privacy: A How-To

Introduction

With the leak of classified NSA documents and their entailing revelations, Edward Snowden has become a household name. He single-handedly caused millions of people to rethink their electronic lives – and their assumptions of privacy. Now, those people (and businesses) are scrambling to find solutions to a problem they didn’t know existed, or chose to remain blissfully unaware, a number of months ago.

There have been numerous blog posts and documents about enhancing your systems to increase privacy protection, and I thought that I would summarize many of them from the perspective of someone who works in the industry. The sections of this article are organized in order of complexity (and tinfoil hattiness). The easiest and most basic measures will be in section 1 while the most complex and restrictive measures will be in the last.

Continue reading

Standard