General, Security, Privacy

History and its Uncanny Ability to Repeat Itself

The EFF has published a well-cited and informed article on why they view the current trend of dragnet surveillance to be thoroughly against the constitution of the U.S.

Even if you are not an American, this article touches on the ideals of many. It describes the context around why the Fourth Amendment was included and goes into specific detail as to who and why they thought it so important:

“Using ‘writs of assistance,’ the King authorized his agents to carry out wide ranging searches to anyone, anywhere, and anytime regardless of whether they were suspected of a crime. These ‘hated writs’ spurred colonists toward revolution and directly motivated James Madison’s crafting of the Fourth Amendment.”

I highly recommend reading the entire article: The NSA’s “General Warrants”: How the Founding Fathers Fought an 18th Century Version of the President’s Illegal Domestic Spying

 

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Programming, Security, Privacy, Technical

A Look At Using Discovered Exploits

There are usually two general steps for a software exploit to be created.

The first step is the vulnerability discovery. This is the hardest of the two steps. It requires in-depth knowledge about the target software, device, or protocol and a creative mind that is tuned to edge cases and exceptions.

The second step is the exploitation of the discovered vulnerability. This requires the developer to take the vulnerability description and write a module or script that takes advantage of it.

This article will address the second step: Exploit creation.

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General

The Value of a Secret

Suppose that, while teaching a class some engaging topic, I keep a secret from the class and only reveal it at the end of the term. This secret provides a sudden realization to the students that they can take into their next year — A real ‘Aha! moment’. I only ask them that they do not reveal the secret to any classes that haven’t taken the course yet so that they can have the same experience. This may work for a while, but inevitably one student, through malice or ignorance, will reveal the secret to someone they shouldn’t have. This then spreads throughout the whole student body until the experience for all future classes is ruined.

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Uncategorized

Debriefing on the Apple-FBI Debacle: The Aftermath

The Event

As many of you may have heard, in February the FBI requested that Apple make a modification to their systems to allow them to have access to an encrypted iPhone — which swiftly invoked the ire of the security community. Many experts asked why the FBI would even ask such a “ludicrous” and “short-sighted” question.

They questioned the FBI’s understanding of basic encryption principles and quipped that the decision must have been made by a politician since no security expert would have made such a request. They further pointed to the past revelations about Snowden’s leaks and how many government associations have recently (and continue to) abuse the powers they¬†have been given in this area.

Many worried that such a request would set a precedent, and even the FBI director admitted that it most likely would.

Apple responded in kind and denied the request. This signaled the start of significant political posturing by both players to garner support for their cause. The security community and many industry leaders quickly sided with Apple.

Ultimately the FBI elected to contract a third party who used an unknown exploit to gain access to the device. Both parties ceased their posturing and stood down.

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Programming, Technical, Uncategorized

Installing scikit-learn; Python Data Mining Library

Update: The instructions of this post are for Python 2.7. If you are using Python 3, the process is simplified. The instructions are here:

Starting with a Python 3.6 environment.

Assumptions (What I expect to already be installed):

  1. Install numpy: pip install numpy
  2. Install scipy: pip install scipy
  3. Install sklearn: pip install sklearn

Test installation by opening a python interpreter and importing sklearn:
python
import sklearn

If it successfully imports (no errors), then sklearn is installed correctly.

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Programming, Technical

An Experiment on PasteBin

A while ago I was browsing the public pastes on PasteBin and I came across a few e-mail/password dumps from either malware or some hacker trying to make a name for himself.

As I perused the information, I was shocked to find usernames, emails, passwords, social security numbers, credit card numbers, and more in these dumps. I reported the posts as credit card info and SSNs are nothing to trifle with, but the thought lingered as to why they were public in the first place. There must be a way to automate the process of reporting these posts, I thought, usernames and especially passwords hold a very unique signature: at least one upper-case letter, at least one lower-case letter, at least one digit, and at least 8 characters long.

How many words in the english language have that particular combination?

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