Showing Up

Richard Branson talks at length in his book “Like a Virgin” about various topics in the business world. He addresses issues brought up by aspiring entrepreneurs and seasoned veterans in their journey to provide great products and services.

One of those points Richard addresses is the importance to simply show up. I remember reading that section and thinking that I would take this advice with a grain of salt. What if I am competing against some of the best in the world?

I was skeptical.

A few months passed and I received an email from a prominent financial institution; it detailed a contest where Canadian postsecondary students can submit an essay on what their vision of a responsible financial institution is.

I was intrigued.

I started thinking. I am not a financial institution expert or well-versed in what makes them responsible. All I could do was think of my own convictions. What did I think a financial institution that was responsible look like? It ended up looking like a simple essay with a list of suggestions – and it was. I was certain that I would not win, but I felt strongly about it.

I am surrounded by smart people all day. I would wager that most of them are far smarter than me, but I was the only one who entered the contest. All of them said something similar when I asked them if they would enter the competition: there would be people far smarter than them who would write something and win.

I definitely had those same thoughts, but instead of giving up before I had even written a single word I figured that I would at least try. I showed up.

I wrote something that I felt strongly about. Why wouldn’t I show people?

I placed second in the Canada-wide contest.

New York Magazine published an article in February of 2011 that covered research on just this topic. The studies that were referenced identified links in children that were told they were “smart” and their likelihood to try something that was not inherently natural for them. In general they found that children who were constantly praised for their intelligence were more likely to quit when things didn’t come naturally.

I am extending this idea to include self-deprecating mentalities in adults who believe themselves to be intelligent.

Intelligent adults will assess the situation and gauge their ability to succeed based on their own perception of their capabilities. The difference between the study with the children and my extension into the adult realm is that the children actually try before their failure is realized. The adults encounter their difficulty before attempting anything. The result is the same. Both groups do not complete the attempt.

This brings further reinforcement to the saying “you are your own worst enemy.”

I suppose I should be grateful for that mentality as it allows others, such as myself, to try and succeed. I cannot help but wonder, though, what breakthroughs might have happened if those people would actually try.

Sources:

New York Magazine, How Not to Talk to Your Kids: The inverse power of praise, http://nymag.com/news/features/27840/

Like a Virgin: Secrets They Won’t Teach You In Business School, Richard Branson, http://www.virgin.com/richard-branson/books/like-a-virgin

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