“Smart”

When I tell someone that I am a Computer Scientist, and that I am working towards finishing my Master’s Degree in it, many of them remark on how “smart” I must be to achieve such a goal. I am taken aback by this response as I do not view myself as any more intelligent than they are. What, then, makes Computer Scientists fall into such an automatic assumption?

The answer may lie, not in the intelligence of the individuals, but in the way that they interact with their surroundings. Their world.

I am a Computer Scientist, but my skills do not fall solely within that realm. I am an avid baker. I surf and skateboard. I am mechanically inclined and can fix my own vehicles. I can play multiple instruments. I am known to write occasional prose and poetry. I read frequently – and in various topics. I keep up in current events. I have an extensive knowledge of movies and music. I play billiards at the competitive level. I am an amateur scotch taster.

The question is why did I decide to develop these hobbies and skills? The answer, for me at least, is that I was curious. I started baking bread because I was curious how it would work out. I got quite good at it through trial and error. Now, I can bake a decent loaf or two with no trouble at all. I have even made artisan loafs at the request of friends. When I saw a Youtube video of someone playing the ukelele I thought that it would be fun to play. I went to the music store, bought a cheap ukelele, and started to play some basic tunes from online tutorials. Now I can play a variety of songs – which goes well for when I’m surfing.

Many Computer Scientists are just like me. It is unacceptable for them to “not know” what to do if they need to, say, sharpen a knife. They will go out and learn how to sharpen their own knives. If there is a problem, they try to fix it. If there is something they do not know, they try to learn about it so that, next time, they will know. We are constantly learning. This might be brought on by such a fast-paced field – where first-year textbooks can be outdated before the students graduate.

This trait is not limited to Computer Scientists. There are many who are driven to better themselves. Sure, it takes some grades to get into Computer Science, but it takes grades to get into many fields of study. The “smart” that seems to be automatically associated with Computer Science may derive from this need to better ourselves – and solve problems. This builds a large skill-set that helps us solve even more problems.

And solving problems is something that we are very good at doing. Maybe that is what “smart” is after all.

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